Sharing in the Joy: Reliable Holiday Pet Safety Tips

Sharing in the Joy: Reliable Holiday Pet Safety Tips

iStock_000015099493_MediumThe holiday season is a bright (if not chilly) one, but it’s not just about twinkling lights, yummy treats, and heart-warming stories. In the coming weeks, take some time to create a pet-friendly holiday environment and avoid unnecessary accidents or emergencies. Using equal parts preparation and planning, this holiday pet safety guide is a great place to start.

Taking it all in

You may have guessed that the holidays are one of our favorite times of year, and we love offering ideas for great pet gifts, winter safety, and holiday-themed pet activities. However, with so much to do, your pet’s needs may end up on the back burner. Sure, you’re good for a snuggle or two at bedtime, but the routine that your pet thrives on can easily get sidelined by all the visitors and events.

Preparing Your Pet

If you’re hosting during the holidays, it’s important that your pet has a place to which he or she can retreat. To completely avoid the risks associated with strangers and chaos, you may want to think about boarding your pet with us.

If your pet is to remain at home with you, please consider the following ideas:

  • Ask your guests not to feed your pet any poisonous people foods, including fatty meat, chocolate, Xylitol (a common sugar substitute), or alcohol.
  • Caution guests to be mindful when entering or exiting your home.
  • To mitigate possible escapes, watch your pet closely in the backyard and set up an exercise pen at the front door.
  • Always keep your pet’s crate accessible or maintain an area or room that he or she can retreat to when the noise is too loud.
  • If you are establishing certain components of dog or puppy training, a party may be a good time to practice – or it could be a disaster. Remain in tune with your pet, and if a break is necessary (for your pet and your guests), don’t delay!

Decor and Holiday Pet Safety

It just wouldn’t be the holidays without sparkly decorations and twinkling lights. However, no decor is worth a visit to our emergency room:

  • Items like tinsel or popcorn strings can cause intestinal obstructions; pine needles can also perforate the GI tract.
  • Presents containing people food should not be under the tree until you are ready to open gifts.
  • Lit candles should always remain out of the “wag-zone” or on a surface that your cat can’t leap onto and knock over.
  • Certain holiday plants are poisonous. Keep your pet away from poinsettia, mistletoe, holly, and amaryllis. Please call us if you have any questions about flora.
  • After holiday meals (leftovers count!), make sure to take the trash outside and secure the lid so your pet cannot force it open.

The Extra Mile

It can sometimes feel like the holidays are here and gone in the blink of an eye. It’s important to take the time to show your pet how much you love and appreciate him or her. An extra run, more play time, or an extra cuddle session can go a long way to ensure holiday pet safety. From our family to yours, we hope you have a happy, jolly, and safe holiday!